Blog: And the rains came down

You know and expect the rainy season to bring rain… but how much rain, how fast and what it will bring with it, is something you can’t quite prepare for.

Three weeks ago, the rainy season began and last week it brought with it the looming threat of incredibly heavy rainfall.

On Wednesday, that threat developed into Tropical Storm Beatriz, hitting Oaxaca on Thursday evening. Although it never eventuated into a Hurricane, it left behind a trail of disaster in its wake.

Over the past two months we have been measuring rainfall on the roof of our house. Last week the increase was so dramatic that on one day we accumulated over 390mm of water. Wednesday evening, as we were (very thankfully) tucked up in our cosy bed, we could hear the sound of water on the walls, seeping into our room. As we quickly turned on the light to inspect the floor, we realised that even though our home is made from solid concrete, houses here just aren’t built to withstand these conditions. On Thursday night, after visiting friends for a dinner by candlelight, we decided to leave our truck up the hill stuck in mud and return home by foot, venturing out in the storm.

We got off disaster free, with only seven leaks in our home. But the same cannot be said for others, both here in Pluma and throughout southern Mexico.

Around our beautiful state of Oaxaca the storm created landslides, destroyed homes, caused nine rivers to overflow, collapsed roads, left many people displaced and robbed men, women and children of their lives.

Walking through the villages and towns here, you might not think this storm affected many at all. However, when you speak to people and visit their homes – you see and hear quite a different story. Maybe it’s because those that live here, have learned to be resilient. Or maybe it’s from years of devastating events, that this mindset has developed. Whatever it is, these villages have stood here for generations and although homes may not be built to withstand hurricane season, the people here in Pluma Hidalgo certainly are.


Drawing of hands holding coffee beans


By Jess Pantoja-Sanders – TLF Field Director, Mexico


The Lucy Foundation’s team in Mexico are gearing up to fix homes damaged by tropical storm Beatriz. To do this, they will need proper tools and provisions. To help out, you can donate here

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21 hours ago

The Lucy Foundation

This traditional Oaxacan hot chocolate has been freshly roasted, ground and blended with cinnamon bark, raw sugar and almonds to make the most delicious bittersweet hot chocolate.

We'll even throw in an extra Oaxacan hot chocolate so you can enjoy sipping from your TLF cup even more!

Order your Oaxacan Chocolate Bundle here: www.thelucyfoundation.com/help-us-out/
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2 days ago

The Lucy Foundation

Love coffee, peppermint and all things good for your skin? Check out our TLF pamper pack. The pack includes a body scrub, a soap (made with Pluma coffee!) and a lip balm.

Order today to ensure you receive delivery for Christmas!

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1 week ago

Amazing initiative by the talented Dr Robbie! ... See MoreSee Less

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1 week ago

The Lucy Foundation

Today is International Day of Persons with Disabilities and we are celebrating the empowerment of the disability community and ensuring inclusiveness and equality.

Last week, some of our loved ones got together to celebrate that very thing - empowerment - at the 2018 Attitude Awards. For both themselves and others. Congratulations to Jackie de Bruin for winning the Spirit of Attitude Award, and to Umi Asaka for being a finalist in the Making a Difference category. We are so proud of everyone in The Lucy Foundation whānau and can't wait to continue empowering people through inclusiveness and equality.
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